Can We Choose Our Gender Identity?

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UCLA Magazine

Can we choose our gender, or is it innate? The answer may lie somewhere in between.

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Fructose alters hundreds of brain genes, which can lead to a wide range of diseases

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UCLA scientists report that diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids can reverse the damage

A range of diseases — from diabetes to cardiovascular disease, and from Alzheimer’s disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder — are linked to changes to genes in the brain. A new study by UCLA life scientists has found that hundreds of those genes can be damaged by fructose, a sugar that’s common in the Western diet, in a way that could lead to those diseases.

Syrup contains fructose, which alters brain genes linked to many diseases, UCLA life scientists report. Read more

Want a good night’s sleep? Eat dark chocolate

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dailymail.co.uk

  • The nutrient-rich recipe helps control how cells keep their form of time
  • Also supports healthy immune system, prevents cancers and heart disease
  • Discovery could aid development of chronotherapy: time-specific treatment

Eating dark chocolate could be the key to getting a good night’s sleep, a new study suggests.

The product is rich in magnesium – an essential mineral that keeps body clocks running on time, say scientists.

So, indulging in a sweet treat could help people remain adapted to the rhythms of night and day, ensuring a better-quality sleep.

The nutrient is found in many foods including green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, fish, beans, whole grains, avocados, yoghurt, bananas and dried fruit.

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Want a good night’s sleep? Eat dark chocolate

 Like our page Go Africa Health on Facebook  twitter:  @GoAfricaHealth 

dailymail.co.uk

  • The nutrient-rich recipe helps control how cells keep their form of time
  • Also supports healthy immune system, prevents cancers and heart disease
  • Discovery could aid development of chronotherapy: time-specific treatment

 

Eating dark chocolate could be the key to getting a good night’s sleep, a new study suggests.

The product is rich in magnesium – an essential mineral that keeps body clocks running on time, say scientists.

So, indulging in a sweet treat could help people remain adapted to the rhythms of night and day, ensuring a better-quality sleep.

The nutrient is found in many foods including green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, fish, beans, whole grains, avocados, yoghurt, bananas and dried fruit.

Read more

11 healthy ways to hack a BBQ

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mensfitness

Your average American BBQ is a diet minefield. You run the risk of negating all your hard work in the gym, or looking like a jerk by refusing Grandma’s potato salad.

Use this chart, which ranks the most common offerings by nutritional value; and check out how to portion your plate to keep servings in check so you can enjoy your favorite foods this summer—and keep your physique.

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YOUR LIFE WHEN YOU DRINK COFFEE…

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EAT THIS, NOT THAT!

USA! We’re number one! What am I referring to? Coffee consumption of course!

The US is the world’s biggest consumer of the beverage with around 83 percent of adults drinking the stuff in 2013. That’s up from 78 percent a year earlier, according to the National Coffee Association’s online survey. They also discerned that your average Joe drinks up to three cups of joe a day. With so many people guzzling coffee, we decided to dive into the more nuanced and more surprising list of things that coffee can do to and for the human body.

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Blacks Still Trail in HIV Care

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JAMA

Black teens and adults with HIV infection receive less medical care than their white counterparts while patients of both races fall short of national goals set to ensure effective, ongoing care.

In a recent study, CDC researchers analyzed data for teens and adults with HIV diagnoses reported through 2015 in 32 states and the District of Columbia. The data represent 65% of black patients living with HIV infection at the end of 2013. Among black patients diagnosed in 2014, 72% were linked with medical care within a month after their diagnosis. Among white patients, the figure was 79%. About 22% of black and white patients diagnosed that year had a CD4 cell count less than 200/µL.

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Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Unmade in the USA

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JAMA

Mitochondrial replacement therapy, an experimental approach that takes aim at maternally inherited mitochondrial diseases, is on the verge of being implemented in the United Kingdom, almost 2 years after it received approval from the UK Parliament. In a ruling issued on December 15, 2016, the UK Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority (HFEA) concluded that mitochondrial replacement therapy “can be used cautiously for risk reduction treatments in certain cases where alternative treatments would be of little or no benefit to mothers at risk of passing mitochondrial disease onto their children.”

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Birth defects strike 1 in 10 U.S. pregnancies affected by Zika

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CBSNews

One in 10 pregnant U.S. women with confirmed Zika infection in 2016 had a baby with virus-related birth defects, federal health officials reported Tuesday.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last year received reports from 44 states of nearly 1,300 expecting mothers with possible Zika infection. In most cases, Zika was acquired during travel abroad to an area with active transmission of the mosquito-borne virus.

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THE ONE TIME YOU SHOULDN’T DRINK LEMON WATER

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blackdoctor