Overview of the Go Africa Health Mobile solution for the African Union on 4/13/2016 sponsored by Payinitatives

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We are proud to be able to Present our Mobile Health Solution during the Pay Initiatives 2016 event at African Union headquarters in NYC on 4/13/2016!

What is the Go Africa Health Mobile solution?

  • Mobile & Adaptable Health for Africans
  • Fully Supports Sustainable Development Goals #3,11, & 17
  • View the Video for more information

Go Africa Health is proud to Present its Mobile Health Solution @PAY Initiatives- 2016 @ The African Union headquarters in NYC on 4/13/2016

We are proud to be able to Present our Mobile Health Solution during the Pay Initiatives 2016 event at African Union headquarters in NYC on 4/13/2016!

What is the Go Africa Health Mobile solution?

  • Mobile & Adaptable Health for Africans
  • Fully Supports Sustainable Development Goals #3,11, & 17

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#PAYINITIATIVES  & #GAHEALTH

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In November, with the Ebola outbreak in West Africa showing no signs of slowing, the list of people climbing aboard planes to Liberia and Sierra Leone was not terribly long. Deborah Theobald, the co-founder of Cambridge-based health care company Vecna Technologies, was one of them. Accompanying her were two new tools that, it was hoped, could aid health workers trying to care for stricken patients.One was a briefcase-sized electronic medical record system, a field-ready version of a product that Vecna Technologies designed to digitally store and share patient information.

The other was “telepresence” robot made by New Hampshire company VGo Communications — a camera and recording system on wheels that could be controlled from afar by an iPad app, meant to help nurses talk to each other across containment zones. Read more

Stuck in the waiting room

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A long-touted health-care revolution may at last be about to arrive

Oct 11th 2014 | ROME | From the print edition

THE idea of telemedicine—health care provided using telecommunications equipment—has a lengthy history. Radio News, an American magazine, devoted its cover to a patient at home consulting a doctor in his surgery via a television link as long ago as 1924. When NASA began monitoring astronauts in space in the 1960s, fantasy became reality. It has been touted as health care’s future ever since.

But even smartphones and tablets have failed to usher in the telemedicine revolution: most health care still happens face to face. Now, enthusiasts think the wait is nearly over. Governments have been slow to embrace an approach that could improve coverage and outcomes, as well as saving money. But they are under increasing pressure from ageing populations and a surge in chronic diseases, just as public budgets are being squeezed.

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