LAUGHING MAKES YOUR BRAIN WORK BETTER

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

Men’s Fitness

Studies show that laughter improves memory.

Laughter is great not just for your mood, but for your gray matter, says a new study out of Loma Linda U., where a group of adults who watched a funny video for 30 minutes did better on unrelated short-term-memory tests afterward than a separate group who’d just sat twiddling their thumbs.


Read more

Advertisements

Read more

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

  • Say pilsner and black beer is most effective
  • Can halve the amount of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which have been linked to colorectal cancer

As barbecue season approaches, researchers have discovered an unlikely ingredient that could improve the safety of your meat – letting it swill in beer.

They say that letting meat marindade in pilsner can help reduce the formation of potentially harmful cancer-causing substances in grilled meats.

They say pilsner and black beer are most effective, halving the amount of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which have been linked to colorectal cancer.

Read more

Medical Daily

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

 

Medical Daily

Dec 10, 2014 02:21 PM

Turmeric is a main spice in curry — it’s a yellow-colored, bitter-tasting ginger root that can also be quite medicinal. Turmeric has been used to treat arthritis, heartburn, stomach issues, and diarrhea, among other things throughout human history — but now researchers have found a new potential outlet for the root in treating disorders involving fear memories, like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

In a new study led by Glenne Schafe, a professor of psychology at Hunter College, researchers found that curcumin — the principal compound found in turmeric — impaired the formation of fear memories in the brain after a traumatic experience.

Read more

Read more

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

The Huffington Post

 

Your love for avocados is oh-so right, according to a new study that finds that eating an avocado a day can improve bad cholesterol levels — at least in overweight and obese people.

Avocados have gotten a bad rap in the past because they’re high in calories and fat. But it’s their richness in monounsaturated fat that researchers say gives avocado its ability to lower bad cholesterol.

Read more

From the print edition

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

The Economist

Electronic cigarettes and health

The latest investigation of vaping suggests it can help you quit smoking

 

Dec 20th 2014 | From the print edition

THERE are few more reliable routes to an early grave than cigarette smoking. But despite the dangers, nicotine addicts find it almost impossible to kick the habit. Half of those who try to stop “cold turkey” will fail within a week. Fewer than 5% manage to stay clean for a year or more. Crutches such as nicotine patches or gum, which provide the drug without the cigarettes, can help—but only a little.

Read more

Read more

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

 Men’s Fitness

How to avoid the possibility of eating poisonous rice.

Eaters of white and brown rice have healthier diets— they take in more fruits and vegetables and less saturated fat and added sugar, a Baylor College of Medicine study of more than 14,000 adults showed. But all’s not well in Riceville. It turns out, the grain is often tainted with carcinogenic metals, especially when crops are grown in once industrial areas. In China, the concern is cadmium, a metallic compound that may cause cancer and kidney disease. In fact, a Greenpeace East Asia test found unsafe levels of cadmium in 12 of 13 rice crops sampled. Stateside, arsenic is the enemy, though the FDA has so far deemed levels too low to cause immediate adverse health effects.

Read more

From the print edition

 

follow us on twitter@GoAfricaNetwork

 

The Economist

Food allergies

Patching things up

A new treatment for allergy to peanuts is being developed

 

Dec 20th 2014 | CHICAGO | From the print edition
  • T

ANAPHYLAXIS, an allergic reaction that causes swellings and rashes and can thus block a person’s airways, is always unpleasant and sometimes lethal. Often, the allergen is in a specific sort of food. Milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soyabeans and wheat are particularly risky. Together, they account for 90% of anaphylactic incidents in America, a country in which between 4% and 8% of children are reckoned to have a food allergy, and in which a third or more of such allergies are potentially life-threatening.

Read more

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

FEB. 3, 2015

HEALTH

 Americans’ exposure to secondhand smoke has declined by half since 2000, federal health authorities reported Tuesday, as states and municipalities banned smoking in bars, restaurants and offices, and fewer Americans smoked inside their homes.The share of American nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke fell to 25 percent in 2012 from 53 percent in 2000, according to an analysis of federal health data by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Exposure was determined by testing for cotinine, a marker of nicotine in the blood.

Read more

Sugary Drinks Tied to Earlier Menstruation

BODY

 

follow us on twitter@GoAfricaNetwork

 

JANUARY 27, 2015 

Age of first menses has decreased substantially since the early 20th century, and studies have shown that younger age of menarche is associated with increased risk of breast and endometrial cancer in later life.Here is another mark against sugary drinks: A new study has found that drinking them is associated with lowered age of menarche.

By

The study, published online in Human Reproduction, used data on 5,583 girls ages 9 to 14 who had not yet attained menarche at the start. They filled out diet questionnaires yearly from 1996 to 1998. By 2001, 159 still had not yet had their first period.

After controlling for birth weight, maternal age at menarche, physical activity, and many dietary and behavioral factors, they found that girls who drank one-and-a-half 12-ounce cans a day of nondiet soda or sugared iced tea had their first period an average of 2.7 months earlier than those who drank less than two cans a week.

The lead author, Karin B. Michels, an associate professor of epidemiology at Harvard, said that the contribution of sugary drinks to early menarche was independent of the well-known contribution of obesity.

“Our findings are robust,” she said, “and not dependent on body mass index. Sugared beverages are not healthy to begin with, and there should be heightened attention to avoiding them.”

read more at BODY, MENSTRUATION, SUGAR

 

 

 

 

a scientific report

Huffpost Healthy Living

March 10, 2015

Posted: 03/02/2015 3:58 pm EST Updated: 03/02/2015 4:59 pm EST

follow us on twitter: @ GoAfricaNetwork

In mid-February, the government released a scientific report that will shape its 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Think of it as America’s basic nutrition policy. Most people who read the report would have viewed it as a snore; not much has changed.

Yes, the report lifted the longstanding advice to limit cholesterol in foods. That boils down to dropping advice to limit egg yolks. Liver is high in cholesterol, but rarely eaten. Shrimp is high in cholesterol, but so low in saturated fat — the prime driver of high blood cholesterol — that its cholesterol hardly matters.

Read more