a scientific report

Huffpost Healthy Living

March 10, 2015

Posted: 03/02/2015 3:58 pm EST Updated: 03/02/2015 4:59 pm EST

follow us on twitter: @ GoAfricaNetwork

In mid-February, the government released a scientific report that will shape its 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Think of it as America’s basic nutrition policy. Most people who read the report would have viewed it as a snore; not much has changed.

Yes, the report lifted the longstanding advice to limit cholesterol in foods. That boils down to dropping advice to limit egg yolks. Liver is high in cholesterol, but rarely eaten. Shrimp is high in cholesterol, but so low in saturated fat — the prime driver of high blood cholesterol — that its cholesterol hardly matters.

Read more

Advertisements

Read more

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

TIME

The sun is the biggest culprit in causing skin cancer, but there’s a beverage that may thwart it some


You may grab a cup (or two) of coffee every morning to help you wake up and face the day, but you may also be doing your skin a favor. Researchers in a new paper released January 20 say that coffee can protect against melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.


Read more

@DocSamuelJones

 follow us on twitter: @DocSamuelJones, @goAfricaHealth@GoAfricaNetwork ,

 

Los Angeles Times

Drink up, coffee lovers: Neurologists say a healthy appetite for coffee may reduce your risk of developing multiple sclerosis.

We’re not talking a cup or two of joe in the morning. Even a triple espresso might not be enough to register a difference.

In a new study, researchers found that Americans who downed at least four cups of coffee per day were one-third less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than their counterparts who drank no coffee at all. They also found that Swedish adults who guzzled at least six cups of coffee each day were also one-third less likely to get MS.

Read more

TIME

follow us on twitter: @ GoAfricaNetwork

TIME

Getty Images

Statins can lower cholesterol and even tamp down inflammation to keep the risk of heart disease down. But these commonly prescribed drugs may increase the risk of diabetes, and by a considerable amount

drugs that are among most prescribed drugs in America. In a study published in Diabetologia, scientists from Finland found that men prescribed statins to lower their cholesterol had a 46% greater chance of developing diabetes after six years compared to those who weren’t taking the drug. Doctors may have to weigh a serious potential risk before prescribing statins, the cholesterol-lowering What’s more, the statins seemed to make people more resistant to the effects of insulin—which breaks down sugar—and to secrete less insulin. The impact on insulin seemed to be greatest among those who started out with the lowest, and closest to normal, levels of blood glucose. And the higher the dose of the statin, and the longer the patients took them, the greater their risk of diabetes.

Read more

Read more

follow us on twitter: @GoAfricaNetwork

Drug companies who sell testosterone supplements will be required to warn patients that the products may increase the risk for heart attacks and strokes, the Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday.

The agency will require manufacturers of testosterone therapy, available by prescription, to include the warning about potential health risks on product labels.

Men taking testosterone should contact a doctor if they develop symptoms of heart attack or stroke, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness or pain on one side of the body or slurred speech, the FDA said.

A 2014 study in PLOS One found that taking testosterone doubled the risk of heart attack in men over 65 and nearly tripled the risk in younger men with a history of heart disease.

Testosterone is often called the “male hormone” because it causes development of male sex organs, facial hair and other masculine features. Doctors use it to treat the symptoms of hypogonadism, which causes abnormally low testosterone levels. Studies have shown that testosterone can improve sexual function, bone density, lean muscle mass and strength while lowering cholesterol and insulin resistance.

Drug companies also have marketed testosterone directly to consumers, urging aging men to ask their doctors about how to relieve symptoms of low testosterone, or “low T,” such as energy loss, mood changes and reduced sex drive.

Read more

1

follow us on twitter: @ GoAfricaNetwork

The Need to Fast-Track Promising Vaccines

Ebola virus is among the most deadly pathogens, with case fatality rates of up to 90%.1 Ebola virus is categorized as a tier 1 pathogen by the US government because of its potential for deliberate misuse with significant potential for mass casualties. The current outbreak of Ebola virus in West Africa with more than 23 000 cases and 9000 deaths2 also demonstrates the long-underestimated public health threat that Ebola virus poses as a natural human pathogen. There are no licensed vaccines or postexposure treatments for combating Ebola virus. However, substantial progress has been made in developing vaccines and antivirals that can protect laboratory animals against lethal disease.1,3 Advancing these interventions for human use is a matter of utmost urgency.

In this issue of JAMA, Lai et al4 report the use of a first-generation recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus–based Ebola vaccine (VSVΔG-ZEBOV)5 to treat a physician who experienced a needlestick in an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone during the current Ebola virus outbreak. A single dose of the VSVΔG-ZEBOV vaccine was administered approximately 43 hours after the potential exposure. The patient experienced a transient febrile syndrome after vaccination. Importantly, no evidence of Ebola virus infection was detected, and the vaccine elicited strong innate and Ebola virus–specific adaptive immune responses. Most significantly, the vaccine, which expresses the surface glycoprotein of Ebola virus, was able to induce an IgG antibody response against the Ebola virus glycoprotein at a level that has been associated with protection of nonhuman primates.5

It is difficult to draw any definitive conclusions from a single case report. The inability to detect evidence of Ebola virus infection most likely is because there was not an actual exposure; however, it cannot be completely ruled out that the intervention was effective in controlling Ebola virus replication. Even though this patient experienced some adverse events after vaccination, the patient reported having traveler’s diarrhea prior to receiving the VSVΔG-ZEBOV vaccine; therefore, it is also not possible to draw any strong conclusions regarding any adverse events from this case in regard to the safety of the vaccine. This is the second time that the VSVΔG-ZEBOV vaccine has been used to treat a potential exposure to Ebola virus. The initial use occurred in 2009 for a laboratory worker in Germany6 and also involved a needlestick injury. The results of that incident were nearly identical; however, the severity of adverse events following vaccination was less notable in the German case compared with the patient in the case report by Lai et al.4

Read more