malaria vaccine

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For over two decades, the quest to develop a working malaria vaccine has proven largely fruitless. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), about 3.2 billion people worldwide are at risk of being diagnosed with malaria. Every year, nearly 198 million cases are identified. WHO says a significant number of the almost 200 million cases are from Africa. However in recent times not only is there a potential malaria vaccine in the pipeline, a new device which is capable of diagnosing Malaria in minutes has emerged.

John Lewandowski, co-founder and CEO of Disease Diagnostics Group, has invented a new way of diagnosing the deadly disease using two magnets and a laser pointer. He believes that this will eradicate malaria by strengthening the offensive against it, while curbing issues regarding delay in detection.

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Extended-Release Medications for Obesity Treatment

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JAMA

2015

Naltrexone Extended-Release Plus Bupropion Extended-Release for Treatment of Obesity

 

In September 2014, a proprietary formulation of naltrexone extended-release (ER) plus bupropion-ER (brand name Contrave) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA),1 becoming the fourth medication approved for long-term weight management in patients with obesity.2 Liraglutide (brand name Saxenda), a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, was also approved for obesity treatment in December 2014. This Viewpoint discusses naltrexone-bupropion ER and its potential use for the adjunctive treatment of patients with obesity.

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Men’s Fitness

 

A flood of recent studies is giving us new insights into how important getting enough good sleep is for staying healthy, feeling great, and thinking straight. So take a short siesta and check out the slumber stats below.

Sleep deprivation makes you eat more.

Skip sleep, and the next day you’ll eat too many calories from fat and too few from carbs, according to a UPenn School of Medicine study. When subjects were kept from sleeping, a brain region called the salience network, which regulates emotions and bodily sensations like a racing heart, lit up and raised their fat cravings. By the way, if you do pig out, just don’t do it late at night: Eating when the body’s usually asleep can hamper learning, damage memory, hurt the immune system, and even lead to type-2 diabetes, UCLA researchers say.

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SFGATE

 

 

With vivid burgundy seeds and a distinctive sweet flavor, the pomegranate is a nutrient-dense fruit that is fun to eat and steeped in history. Its medieval French name originates from the Latin roots for “apple” and “seedy,” according to the University of California. It was first cultivated in Iran, but spread to the Mediterranean area and later to the Americas. People during the Middle Ages thought pomegranates were good for liver inflammation, a common malady in men, but today, other male health benefits are being discovered.

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JAMA

2015

 

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a first-of-its-kind weight loss treatment device that electronically suppresses hunger signals traveling between the stomach and the brain. The Maestro Rechargeable System, which is manufactured by EnteroMedics of St Paul, Minnesota, consists of an electrical pulse generator, wire leads, and electrodes that are implanted into the abdomen and intermittently send electrical pulses to the vagus nerve.

A new device targets the brain-stomach nerve connection that controls feelings of hunger and satiety.

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Muscle & Body Magazine

Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil can help you.

Supplements are great when taken in conjunction with a healthy diet and exercise plan, but some supplements can be viewed as more essential than others. A good protein blend, for example, is crucial for building muscle and preserving lean body mass, but beyond the aesthetic reasoning behind most supplements on the shelves today, there is one in particular that belongs at the top of your list: omega-3 fatty acids.

These fatty acids derived from fish oil have been a staple in my supplement regimen for years due to their positive effects on my physical and athletic performance, as well as their brain-boosting, heart-healthy and anti-inflammatory properties. If you’re not taking an omega-3 supplement, now may be the time to start.

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cardiovascular disease

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Men’s Fitness

Your grandparents never thought twice about eating foods that were loaded with saturated fat. Not long ago, people drank milk with cream on the top, ate whole eggs for breakfast, and enjoyed steak for dinner—and led normal, healthy lives. Yet today, despite all the warnings we’re told to heed about saturated fat and its deleterious effects on the heart, cardiovascular disease is more prevalent than ever. We corralled some of our most trusted nutritionists and asked for their best advice on saturated fats.

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HealthDay

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HealthDay

Taking aspirin every day appears to reduce the odds of developing and dying from colon, stomach or esophageal cancer, a new study suggests.

Based on a review of available studies, researchers determined that the benefits of aspirin therapy for preventing cancer outweigh the risks. Millions of people already take this inexpensive drug to prevent or treat heart disease.

“We came to the conclusion that most people between the ages of 50 and 65 would benefit from a daily aspirin,” said lead researcher Jack Cuzick, head of the Center for Cancer Prevention at Queen Mary, University of London.

“It looks like if everyone took a daily aspirin, there would be less cancer, and that would far outweigh any side effects,” added Cuzick.

Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most serious side effect associated with aspirin.

Taking aspirin for 10 years could cut colon cancer risk by around 35 percent and deaths from colon cancer by 40 percent, the researchers reported Aug. 6 in the Annals of Oncology.

Daily aspirin also can reduce the risk of esophageal and stomach cancers by 30 percent and deaths from these cancers by 35 to 50 percent, the investigators reported.

Dr. Leonard Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, said this study falls short of a recommendation that everyone take aspirin to prevent cancer. “But it rises to the level that people should have a discussion with their doctor,” he said.

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Men’s Fitness

The latest fad in homeopathy to hit the United States has roots in an un­likely place: the salt caves of Eastern Europe—a sort of primordial spa where people flocked for eons to treat ailments ranging from respiratory illnesses to skin infections. Dry salt therapy (or, as it’s officially known, “halotherapy”) involves basking in the sodium-rich air of small, custom-crafted “salt chambers.” Its lack of regulation and scientific backing hasn’t stopped its surge in popularity. According to Ulle Lutz, president of consultation service Salt Chambers Inc., about 150 halotherapy facilities have sprung up in the U.S. in the past two years. We gave one a test run.

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LAUGHING MAKES YOUR BRAIN WORK BETTER

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Men’s Fitness

Studies show that laughter improves memory.

Laughter is great not just for your mood, but for your gray matter, says a new study out of Loma Linda U., where a group of adults who watched a funny video for 30 minutes did better on unrelated short-term-memory tests afterward than a separate group who’d just sat twiddling their thumbs.


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